Most love addicts do not recognize that they have a problem. On the outside, it can be difficult to diagnose. After all, most of us are looking for love and that special someone to settle down with for the rest of our lives. However, when someone is more concerned about the process of falling in love than the person, an addiction can be formed. Dr. Lara Dye, a CSAT and exceptional clinical psychologist in Austin, TX, can help. Below, we’ll highlight three of the signs of a love addiction and how you can get help. Contact Dr. Lara in Austin today!

SIGNS OF LOVE ADDICTION

  • All activities center around finding “the one.” Love addictions are caused usually by something deeper as the person has a deep desire to feel loved and wanted. As such, he or she seeks the feeling of love, but once the feeling has dissipated, the relationship ends. The person usually needs to feel like he or she is the most important thing in the other’s life.
  • You fantasize about love. The thought of love and being in love dominates your thoughts and your activities. You’ll engage in activities you don’t even enjoy doing, such as exercising or recreational drugs, just to be with someone you like or desire a relationship with. You give up your own interests in order to pursue love.
  • Your relationships are detrimental to all involved. You are so afraid of being alone that you cling to the other person. You do whatever to please that person. You’re very jealous of that person when he or she chooses to spend time with others. You smother your partner to put it simply until either you fall “out of love” or the other person can’t take it anymore.

Dr. Lara Dye in Austin has years of experience of helping those with process addictions, including love addiction, get the help he or she needs. Dr. Lara Dye will help you identify underlying causes, which is often rooted in childhood trauma — another one of Dr. Lara Dye’s specialties. You don’t have to constantly fear being alone. Contact her today!

Therapy for Love Addiction

Recently in the addiction field, attention has turned towards understanding process addiction. Addictions to substances are more easily understood, as most people have experienced an altering in their feelings or mood due to ingesting or taking a substance.

Now, experts in addiction have begun to look more closely at how processes, such as eating, sex,​ work, gambling, and even love and relationships actually alter brain chemistry and can provide a high in the process of an action. Those with process addictions are often surprised to find that hindering or stopping those behaviors can cause psychological withdrawal, not unlike withdrawal from substances.